The Other Rogue River Gorge

When people speak of the Rogue River Gorge, they mean usually the Gorge at Union Creek.  The forestry service certainly thinks so, because they have maps and special ramps for vista points.  However, there is another Gorge, which crosses Mill Creek Drive just south of Prospect, that is equally exciting.  Years ago, this Gorge could be explored off of both sides of the road.  But, eventually,  land adjacent to the Gorge on the north side was sold to private owners, so visitors congregate in the inviting woods on the south side.  The bridge, though, remains, and still offers spectacular views of the Gorge and its canyon wall laced with boulders.  It is hard to believe that over 100 years ago, a covered bridge was all that prevented travelers from tumbling into the Gorge.  “Old-timers”  affirm that there were accidents.  But they also affirm the sense of awe travelers felt when crossing this tumultuous chasm.  The brief video below offers a view of the Gorge in 1958 when there was considerable water pouring down the drop.

About Robert M. Weiss
From an early age, I've taken great pleasure in reading. Also, I learned to play my 78 player when I was quite young, and enjoyed listening to musicals and classical music. I remember sitting on the floor, and following the text and pictures of record readers, which were popular in the 1940s and 50s. My favorites were the Bozo and Disney albums. I also enjoyed watching the slow spinning of 16s as they spun out tales of adventure. I have always been attracted by rivers, and I love to sit on a boulder with my feet in the water, gazing into the mysteries of swirling currents. I especially like inner tubing on the Rogue River in Southern Oregon. Since my early youth, I've been interested in collecting minerals, which have taught me about the wonderful possibilities in colors and forms. Sometimes I try to imagine what the ancient Greeks must have felt when they began to discover physical laws in nature. I also remember that I had a special passion for numbers, and used to construct them out of stones. After teaching Russian for several years, I became a writer, interviewer, editor, and translator. I continue to delight in form, and am a problem solver at heart.

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: