Eastin’s Rogue Haven

From 1953 until 1960, we spent our summer vacation at Eastin’s Rogue Haven.  The mere seven years appear to be so much more, since those were my early childhood years.  Eastin’s consisted of seven modest cabins and we stayed in cabin 7 at the upper end.  Eastin’s also offered a 76 gas station, a small grocery store and served meals.  In the evenings,  polished maple tables shook from the jukebox tunes, and I remember saving dimes so I could watch the jukebox in action.  Salacious post cards with double entendres were on sale to loggers that came into Eastin’s on their daily route along Highway 62.  There were also scenic postcards for tourists.  Rick Eastin, a pipe-smoking, jocular man, operated the cash register together with his mother, Minnie Eastin.  His wife, Aileen Eastin and daughter, Susie, worked in the coffee shop.  As a child, I recall trying to balance on a log outside the store and not having much success.

To go into cabin 7 is to go into a world when my senses were keenly tuned and each impression had an impact.  It was a world of wanton discovery and excitement.  Outside of the cabin was a small rocky island where my father showed me a “rock” that could float(it was pumice).  My grandma had the best view of the river, and I loved to sit in her bedroom and watch the current flow as it approached the first riffle.  We floated the Rogue River from Eastin’s to Casey’s State Park many times.  There was one spot where the river flowed over a shallow bar into a log jam.  I remember hearing my first radio announcement:  ” Yesterday a group of boy scouts were drowned when their canoe overturned and they were swept under a log jam below Eastin’s Rogue Haven.”

Our Path To The River

After building our home in 1980, we had to clear out some brush and poison oak to create a path to the river.  Technically speaking, we are on one of the branches of the Rogue River.  However, this was not always the case.  A flood in the 1970s took the main river away from our property and destroyed one of Dad’s best steelhead holes, which included a whirlpool, and a small falls below it.  But we planted a few redwood trees that blended in well with the oak and ponderosa pine to form our special path.  We, and countless visitors have walked to the river, admiring the surrounding beauty as we headed for the water.  Indeed, our path to the river will always be a special place for us.sc0001a584  sc000086fdsc0000df2fsc000167bbsc0001cdf4OP 1IMG_4847IMG_4851IMG_5129sc000037c9

Scenes From The North Umpqua

NU 5*NU 4The North Umpqua, which arises near Diamond Lake, is one of the most beautiful rivers in America.  Its blue-green water splashing over boulders is a must see for river enthusiasts.  An agreement was made with the Power Commission that if the extensive power plant was built there would be no further dams on the river.  That agreement, and the abundance of forestry-owned land has protected the North Umpqua from further human obstructions.  To top it off, the North Umpqua is world-renowned for its wonderful steelhead fishing.  It is not an easy river to fish, since it offers many ledge rocks that a careless angler could slip off of into turbulent water.  However, that situation deters few.  In fact, during the summer, the Steamboat area is strictly regulated by fishermen to ensure the best fishing.  Should you wish to stay the night, the Steamboat Lodge offers a sumptuous feast known as the Fisherman’s Dinner served at dusk.  From Boulder Creek Campground to Steamboat, the gradient and sharp rocks keep inner tubers and casual tahiti rafters off the river.  Famous rapids include Pinball(Class 4), which swirls around a series of boulders, and Boulder Hole(Class 3), a long rapid that ends in an abrupt drop around a corner.  The river flows through magnificent forest and is highlighted by awe-inspiring spires and rock formations.  The photos  include:   Approaching Boulder Hole, The last drop of Boulder Hole, Happy Rock, Rapid below Headknocker’s 3 .  If you get the chance, do visit!NU 1   NU 3

Lower Takelma Rapid Packs A Wallop For Inner Tubers

Lower Takelma Rapid, just below Takelma Park, packs a real wallop for inner tubers.  The rapid begins with an innocuous rock bar that occurs to the right of an island.  Tubers need to pull to the left as they pass over the bar, because the right current will take them into a tree and an overhanging bush that are close to the right bank.  Nevertheless,  tubers will find themselves on the right.  Now they must pull hard to the left to dodge a waterfall over a ledge on the right, and, in particular, avoid a nasty boulder at the left end of the ledge.  Then they will drop a few feet into some truly large waves.(At high water the waves converge to form a huge hole, which must be dodged to avoid a swim.)  Tubers will need to balance themselves as they climb the steep waves until they encounter calmer water downstream.

The rapid has an interesting history, and the current rapid is a relative newcomer, having been formed by high spring water just a few years before.  As long as I can remember, the river always split into different channels and some of them were so shallow that a child could ford them easily.  As this was one of Dad’s favorite steelhead holes, I often did just that.  An hour to a restless child is a long time and I recall wading the shallow bars around me in search of a shiny jasper or multicolored agate.  Often I was more fortunate than Dad, and the bottom of the raft was littered with shiny minerals.  Over the years the river continued to push the bars down, culminating finally in the threatening Lower Takelma Rapid.  The imprints of children’s feet on the sand bars have become a mere memory.

One Lovely Blog Award And Best Moment Award

I am deeply grateful to photographyartplus for nominating me for these prestigious awards.  I hope that my posts have been of interest to my visitors.

About me:

1.  Blue is my favorite color, since I have a love for rivers.

2.  I began inner tubing the Rogue River when I was 12 and haven’t stopped.

3.  Carousel is one of my favorite musicals.

4.  I am a lifetime member of the British Gilbert and Sullivan Society.

5.  Fluorite and tourmaline are two of my favorite minerals, because they come in many colors.

6.  I have a passion for Lewis Carroll and his illustrators.

7.  I enjoy taking photos of nature.

I would like to nominate the following bloggers for One Lovely Blog Award and Best Moment Award:

1.  auntyuta

2. photographyartplus

3. thesophomoreslump2

4. leaf and twig

5. twng32

6. thejapans

7.oahuhiking

To all of the above, congratulations!

In Memory Of Paul J. Pearson

“… we don’t have boundaries here.  Prospect is simply a concentration, and, if you go away, it dissipates.”  Paul J. Pearson

On September 21, 2012, the town of Prospect lost one of its most prominent citizens and supporters, Paul J. Pearson.  He was born in 1921 and lived most of his life in Prospect until his recent death at the age of 90.

My last post dealt with Pearsoney Falls and he was one of the discoverers.  He retained a lifelong affection for Mill Creek and the nearby Rogue River.  In fact, when I was Director of Medford Education International, he gave a lecture on the Rogue River and its habitat.

I first met Paul in 1987 when I started interviewing people for my Prospect book.  My friend Evelyn Ditsworth Walls had supplied me with a list of names of people, who she thought would be excellent sources of information for my history.  Paul’s name was the first on the list.  When I drove to his home on Mill Creek Drive, I was accompanied by my friend, Hollywood architect, Michael J. Evans.  When we entered Paul’s driveway, I took out my camera and tape recorder and then I heard a yell:   “You can just put that camera right back in the car.  I don’t allow pictures.”  And there are no pictures of Paul in my Prospect book.  Despite an inauspicious beginning, we had a pleasant conversation about Prospect’s history and its inhabitants.  However, his keen, analytical mind displayed itself from the start.

RW:  But your main interest is engineering?

PP:  Well, you have to categorize that.  If you’re asking in terms of what is my approach to the physical world around me, engineering is a very important part of it.  But if you ask what’s my sense of social values, well, engineering has no place at all.  So, that’s why I say the question has to be categorized to be answerable.”

Wittgenstein would have been pleased.  Paul always chose his words carefully, taking time to present his ideas.  When I turned off the tape recorder, Paul felt more relaxed.  We spoke about our mutual respect for the Rogue River, and the fact that we we both opposed the Lost Creek Dam, which flooded the Laurelhurst area.  We also shared an interest in classical music, and a thirst for knowledge.

I liked Paul and respected him.  He was a main contributor to the growth of Prospect and will be missed.

A Dollop Of Humor

A dollop of humor:

1.  The bad news is I’m chronically depressed.  The good news is I’m in denial.

2.  Rock Creek Falls on the North Umpqua should be rated Class 7, because if you navigate the falls successfully, the fishermen will shoot you.